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Fishing report from Joshua R. in Panama City Beach, Florida Book a trip with Captain Joshua here.

Fishing report from Ryan S. in Orange Beach, Alabama Book a trip with Captain Ryan here.

Fishing report from Jw W. in South Padre Island, Texas Book a trip with Captain JW here.

Fishing report from Larry S. in Pensacola, Florida Book a trip with Captain Larry here.

    Well the season is finally starting to heat up. Through March and April you can expect a hot sheepshead bite. We have been catching tank sheepshead and redfish regularly fishing structure and the jetties on our inshore areas. The Spanish Mackerel have moved inside to the pass and inner bay areas for a great opportunity to pick them up on an inshore troll. offshore the fishing has been spectacular with various catches of keeper Triggerfish, vermillion snappers, and seabass. Red snappers are abundant, however, they are catch and release at this time. We have picked up some great catches trolling baits to include Wahoo, and some heavy fighting amberjacks. Although the water temps are cooler than normal, when you can find a good temperature break, you can expect some great hookups. As we progress through April, we look forward to warmer water temps and the fish to get more active. April and May are some of the best times to fish in the Pensacola area as there are numerous opportunities to catch quality offshore action. No matter what you choose, inshore or offshore, the action is hot and you will enjoy fishing with us!

Fishing report from Richie R. in Destin, Florida Book a trip with Captain Richie here.

Fishing report from Cory F. in Freeport, Texas

Fishing report from Trey C. in Aransas Pass, Texas

Fishing report from Corey B. in Galveston, Texas Book a trip with Captain Corey here.

Fishing report from Wilder W. in Dauphin Island, Alabama Book a trip with Captain Wilder here.

Fishing report from Robbie B. in Jacksonville, Florida Book a trip with Captain Robbie here.

Fishing report from Jason G. in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina Book a trip with Captain Jason here.

Fishing report from Seth W. in Orange Beach, Alabama Book a trip with Captain Seth here.

Fishing report from Jason Y. in Destin, Florida Book a trip with Captain Jason here.

Fishing report from Brandon D. in Cape Coral, Florida Book a trip with Captain Brandon here.

Fishing report from James W. in St. Marys, Georgia Book a trip with Captain James here.

    Bottom Fishing is hot right now when the weather let's us go.
    Bottom Fishing is hot right now when the weather let's us go.
    Bottom Fishing is hot right now when the weather let's us go.
    Bottom Fishing is hot right now when the weather let's us go.

Fishing report from Tim B. in Gulf Shores, Alabama

    Had a nice 4 hour trip today, sadly we couldn't keep the Red Snappers (out of season). but got on some big Vermillion Snapper.

Fishing report from Toby S. in Rockport, Texas

Fishing report from Wayne A. in Niceville, Florida Book a trip with Captain Wayne here.

Fishing report from Ozzy Q. in Miami, Florida

Fishing report from Dave Z. in Fort Lauderdale, Florida Book a trip with Captain Dave here.

    Sailfish have been coming through on the reef anywhere from 100 out to 300 feet of water. We have been having success with both live and dead bait fishing. Kite fishing is the prefered method with using live baits and presenting the baits on the surface. Also slow trolling Ballyhoos have been effective. These fish are a prized catch and provide one of the most active and acrobatic fights. A strong run Mackerel inshore catching 4 to 6 per trip and getting Mahi Mahi hook ups offshore. Also catching some decent bottom fish with some Mutton Snapper and Amberjacks. Last year around this time we had a good three to four weeks of productive Ft. Lauderdale fishing. The weather is nice with a little cooler temperatures and consistent trade winds. Here are some rundowns from recent trips: Dustin and Matt from Tennessee chartered us for a half day fishing charter in Fort Lauderdale. We started the morning trolling the reef in 150’ of water. Shortly after getting lines in the water we started catching King Mackerel and they were biting on the deep planner line with a baited sea witch. The guys took turns catching the Kings and we caught a total of 10 fish and ended up keeping 4 of them. The King action was pretty consistent getting strikes every 20 minutes. Next we decided to send a live bait down to a sunken ship wreck. It was a shallower wreck in 120 feet of water. We made up a rig with a 30 foot leader to the live bait and a 16 ounce weight. Sent the bait to the bottom of the wreck and hooked a big Mutton Snapper. For the last part of the charter I decided to run off shore to look for Mahi Mahi. We have been catching them anywhere from 500 feet of water out to 800 feet of water. I started trolling in 500 and by the time we made it out to 600 feet of water caught 2 Mahi Mahi. We had a half day fishing charter in Fort Lauderdale with Steven and Ronnie from Boston. We started the charter with trolling the reef in 150 feet of water. There had been some good trolling action with King Mackerel fishing so we started trolling South. All the King bites came from the two deep planner lines with the baited sea witches. As we were heading South the majority of the hook ups were on the shallower side of the reef in 80 to 90 feet of water. They were mostly smaller sized King Mackerel and some larger ones mixed in. We ended up catching a total of 9 King Mackerel and kept 5 of them. Some of the larger Kings were weighing over 20 pounds. Next we decided to head offshore and target Mahi Mahi. We trolled out to 750 feet of water and found some “slicks” running north and south. It didn’t really look like much but we stayed on the slick and found 6 Mahi Mahi. Of the 6 fish caught we released two and kept 4 of them. Bill and Bradley from Detroit Michigan were on a work convention and brought their families out for a half day charter. The wind had shifted and the water color changed from the day before so I headed a different direction to find the fish. For the first half of the charter we trolled the reef up to the Northern structures and targeted King Mackerel. The family was having a great time catching the Kings and of course the planner rods had all the action. After we had 5 fish in the box we decided to swing for the fences and try for some big game. We cleared the spread of baits and got out the 80’s which are for larger gamefish. The 1st mate rigged the two dead baits with using a single large circle hook in the lower and upper part of the jaw. I positioned the boat into the current and we set out the baits. The fish are traveling into the current and can “smell” the blood and oils coming out of the bait. It didn’t take long before a shark found one of the baits and game on!! The rod bent over and drag started ripping off the reel. Brad was the angler and he did a great job fighting the shark. After a 45 minute fight a large Tiger Shark came up to the surface. The first mate started to wire in the shark and he had the Tiger along side the boat. We first attempted to cut the hook in half with bolt cutters. The Tiger Shark started thrashing from side to side and as I had the bolt cutters firmly clamped down on the hook the fish actually straightened out the hook. Was pretty intense for a moment, the shark swam away and no one got hurt. Steve and Nicole from Orlando Florida booked us for a half day charter in Fort Lauderdale. Steve asked to try fishing offshore for Mahi Mahi and I recommend we first start the morning out and try to catch a few King Mackerel, and then head offshore and look for Mahi. So we started the charter on the reef trolling for King Mackerel and ended up hooking a few fish soon as we started. However they were smaller sized fish and we released them. I continued working the reef a little deeper water and in 180 feet of water found 3 Kings. Now that we caught 5 fish and with 3 in the box the next move was heading offshore to deeper water. I was searching for the same “slicks” I found the day before. Sure enough in 750 feet of water they were still there. The first mate got the spread of baits in the water and we worked down this rip line. After a short period of time we ended up hooking a Sailfish. Steve did a great job angling the fish and we successfully removed the hook, got a quick picture then released the Sail. We got the lines back in the water and continued fishing in this area. It didnt take long before we got another nice bite. This time it was on the planner rod. The line started ripping out and we had a big fish on. The first mate had his gaff ready and the angler was fighting the fish. Steve did a great job fighting this fish as line was ripping out. As the fish was getting closer we could see it was a Wahoo. The 1st mate reached down and gaffed the Wahoo and in the box.

Fishing report from Ron F. in Clearwater, Florida Book a trip with Captain Ron here.

    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.
    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.
    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.
    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.
    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.
    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.
    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.
    The Best Snapper Species Snappers are a fish family that need no introduction. Anglers from all over the world come to Florida to Target & catch them and love them for a variety of reasons. They’re usually easy to locate, are abundant in population, and provide a tasty treat. Just the names “Mangrove Snapper” and “Red Snapper” get every saltwater fisher’s heart racing. But before you think about cooking one up for a tasty treat, we will get U locked & loaded to land a boat load full. We are very fortunate on the West Coast Florida Gulf of Mexico with the Mangrove and the Red Snapper. But other common species include the Cubera Snapper, Lane Snapper, Mutton Snapper, and Yellowtail Snapper. There are actually a total of 125 Snapper species that inhabit the earth’s oceans! Mangrove Snapper These guys have a red or pinkish tint that covers their small, rough scales. And don’t be fooled by their little teeth – they’re seriously sharp! To know where to find these fish, take a hint from their name. You’ll find them in mangrove islands but you can also find them hanging around docks, piers, grass flats, and more. Red Snapper Next up we have one of the largest and most favorable Snapper species, the Red Snapper. This species puts up a tough fight in offshore waters and can weigh up to 50 pounds! They’re also among the best-tasting fish species, period. Unfortunately, though, they’ve been overfished in many places, so there are strict seasons in place, especially here in Florida. Cubera Snapper The Cubera Snapper is another large Snapper species, with the biggest recorded weighing 120 pounds. They can be harder to find and make more of a rare appearance. But that just makes it more exciting when you catch one! These fish are more commonly found in deeper wrecks and reefs. Lane Snapper Next up we have Lane Snapper. A step down from Cubera Snapper, these little guys reach maximum lengths of 20 inches. But what they lack in size, they make up in strength. Lane Snapper will try and take any bait you present, even if that means grabbing it before a larger fish can. They have a pretty mix of white, yellow, and pink to create a tropical-looking fish. And, as with most Snappers, their fillets are quite delicious as well. Mutton Snapper The Mutton Snapper almost looks like a mix of the Mangrove and Lane Snapper, except they’re quite a bit larger. These guys range in size and you catch smaller ones or large ones out on the reefs. Yellowtail Snapper Last on the list, we have Yellowtail Snapper. Another fish on the smaller side, these fish are cute and can be recognized easily by their yellow tails – hence their name. They heavily populate southern Florida, where anglers can constantly rip them up and head home with a small but delicious treat! Snapper Fishing Rules and Regulations Now that you’re aware of common Snapper species, let’s talk about rules and regulations. As mentioned, there are tons of Snapper species out there. That means there are different types of rules for different types of fish, including maximum and minimum lengths, bag limits, and more. It’s very important that you know the difference in regulations for each species. We have You fully covered. We have the Federal Pelagic Species's Permits & NOAA Reef Permits to legally land any/all these snapper Species including ARS - American Red Snapper during the Federal Regulation Season Gulf of Mexico June - Aug We are Fully Credentialed to both Target & Deliver the Snapper Species you deserve & desire.

Fishing report from Joey S. in Destin, Florida Book a trip with Captain Joey here.

    Are looking to find out what’s biting right now in Destin, Florida? November offers excellent inshore fishing opportunities. During this time of year, you can expect to catch a variety of fish species, including: 1 Redfish (Red Drum): Redfish are often abundant in the inshore waters of Destin during October. They can be found near oyster beds, grassy flats, and in the passes. 2 Speckled Trout (Spotted Sea Trout): Speckled trout are a popular target for inshore anglers in Destin. They tend to be active during the fall and can be found around grassy areas, channels, and structure. 3 Flounder: Flounder are another common catch in the inshore waters of Destin during October. They are often found around sandy bottoms, ledges, and near the mouths of rivers. 4 Snook: While not as common as some other species, snook can be found in the inshore waters of Florida, including Destin. They prefer warmer waters and can be found near mangroves and inlets. 5 Black Drum: Black drum are often found in the same areas as redfish and can be caught using similar techniques. They are more active in cooler water temperatures. 6 Sheepshead: Sheepshead are often caught around structure like docks, pilings, and jetties. They have strong teeth and are known for their bait-stealing antics. 7 Spanish Mackerel: While Spanish mackerel are more commonly associated with nearshore and offshore fishing, you may encounter them in the inshore waters of Destin, especially around schools of baitfish. 8 Jack Crevalle: These powerful and hard-fighting fish are often encountered in the inshore waters and can

Fishing report from Jw W. in South Padre Island, Texas Book a trip with Captain JW here.

Fishing report from Justin Z. in Destin, Florida Book a trip with Captain Justin here.

Fishing report from James C. in Pensacola, Florida Book a trip with Captain James here.

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