Damn good fishing guides in Johnson City, Tennessee

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Top fishing trips in Johnson City, TN

Everything to Know About Booking a fishing trip in Johnson City

What are the best fishing trips in Johnson City?

Our Damn Good Guides currently offer 1 trip in Johnson City: Streamer Fishing for Brown Trout guided by Ellis.

All guides on Captain Experiences are licensed, insured, and vetted by our team. You can access their reviews, click through trip photos, read bios to get to know them, and preview trip details like species, techniques, group sizes, boat specs and more.

What types of fishing trips are common in Johnson City?

River fishing is the most popular in Johnson City.

The most commonly sought after species in Johnson City are: 1. brown trout, 2. muskie, 3. rainbow trout, 4. smallmouth bass, and 5. hybrid striped bass.

The most common fishing techniques in Johnson City are fly fishing, light tackle fishing, and artificial lure fishing.

How much does a Johnson City fishing trip cost?

in Johnson City prices can range anywhere from $425 to $650, but the average price for a full day in Johnson City is $544.

When is the best time to go fishing in Johnson City?

The best time to go fishing can depend on a number of factors. Call us to talk fishing!

Where can I get a Johnson City fishing license and what are the bag limits in Johnson City?

See here for more information on fishing licenses in Johnson City, bag limits for target species, and fishing season regulations in Johnson City. When in doubt, your fishing guide will always know the right rules and regulations in Johnson City.



How are fishing conditions in Johnson City?

Johnson City Fishing Reports from Our Damn Good Guides. See more reports for Johnson City.

    Late July 2022 As we enter into the latter half of the summer here in East Tennessee, seasonal patterns are right down the fairway, and fishing has been as good as it gets. I’ll focus on the tailwaters – The Watauga River below Wilbur Dam, and the South Holston River below South Holston Dam. Our tailwaters are fed by their respective dams, and without a lot of precipitation and flow contribution from the tributaries, fishing ‘low’ water (e.g. when the dams are not releasing), particularly in the high traffic areas, is something I tend to avoid. Thankfully, for the last 6+ weeks, the Watauga has been consistently releasing good flows starting in the early afternoon, and we have a healthy amount of precipitation in the 7 day forecast both locally and in the feeder streams through TN and NC. In the last week, which was comprised of 4 full day client floats and 2 days on my own, all on the Watauga River in sections ranging from the Dam to the Lake, surface feeding activity has been consistent enough to provide anglers of nearly all skill levels with shots at brown trout and rainbow trout on dry flies. With some patience, those who have experience in dry fly fishing have landed – and lost – a few trout, both rainbow and brown, approaching 20 inches, with a lot of very sporty 10-12" wild rainbows mixed in. Generation, Dam releases, High Water, whatever you’d like to call it, opens up the river for both the angler and the predatory fish. We have been covering a lot of water, predmoninantly with a streamer rod in hand(s), while stopping for rising fish. Working risers with dry flies can easily take up half the day if that is the angler preference. Streamer fishing has produced some truly remarkable fish for a few folks who came in knowing what to do – it’s not an easy approach, but it’s certainly my favorite, and I am not alone there. For those with less fly fishing experience, or just because it’s also awesome and a change of pace, we’ll throw some fairly sizeable jerkbaits, which always has the potential to elicit some breathtaking eats from the ambush predator brown trout. Some trips go from early afternoon until dusk, while others, client schedule permitting, go past 1a.m.. Starting at 9:30p.m. as of this report (July 27 th ), I’ll break down our gear and rig up mousing rods – streamer rods with floating, glow-tip fly line – and by or before 10p.m., it will be completely dark in many of the runs and pools. While I have run, and still offer, an evening kickoff with a mousing-centric float until 4a.m., the afternoon flows, bite windows, and bug activity recently is not something to be missed. Conventional, streamer, mousing, and dry flies are all in play, and on every cast, I wouldn’t be surprised if an eat resulted in a 10" fish or a 20"+ fish. While we prefer the latter, they are the exception to the rule, though it’s been active enough to cover all of my favorite types of trout fishing as very reasonable options to boat some good fish. Oh, and it’s beetle season, so low water isn’t all bad since we can fish sections that aren’t fished by other boats. Since you’re still here, I’ll add that the stripers from Boone lake are up in the rivers in the lower halves, and feed during the flows and conditions that are prime for both streamer/jerkbait fishing and mousing. I love my office, and while it takes effort, and more often than not, a lot of it, I have had the privilege of watching others fall for it, too.
    Late July 2022 As we enter into the latter half of the summer here in East Tennessee, seasonal patterns are right down the fairway, and fishing has been as good as it gets. I’ll focus on the tailwaters – The Watauga River below Wilbur Dam, and the South Holston River below South Holston Dam. Our tailwaters are fed by their respective dams, and without a lot of precipitation and flow contribution from the tributaries, fishing ‘low’ water (e.g. when the dams are not releasing), particularly in the high traffic areas, is something I tend to avoid. Thankfully, for the last 6+ weeks, the Watauga has been consistently releasing good flows starting in the early afternoon, and we have a healthy amount of precipitation in the 7 day forecast both locally and in the feeder streams through TN and NC. In the last week, which was comprised of 4 full day client floats and 2 days on my own, all on the Watauga River in sections ranging from the Dam to the Lake, surface feeding activity has been consistent enough to provide anglers of nearly all skill levels with shots at brown trout and rainbow trout on dry flies. With some patience, those who have experience in dry fly fishing have landed – and lost – a few trout, both rainbow and brown, approaching 20 inches, with a lot of very sporty 10-12" wild rainbows mixed in. Generation, Dam releases, High Water, whatever you’d like to call it, opens up the river for both the angler and the predatory fish. We have been covering a lot of water, predmoninantly with a streamer rod in hand(s), while stopping for rising fish. Working risers with dry flies can easily take up half the day if that is the angler preference. Streamer fishing has produced some truly remarkable fish for a few folks who came in knowing what to do – it’s not an easy approach, but it’s certainly my favorite, and I am not alone there. For those with less fly fishing experience, or just because it’s also awesome and a change of pace, we’ll throw some fairly sizeable jerkbaits, which always has the potential to elicit some breathtaking eats from the ambush predator brown trout. Some trips go from early afternoon until dusk, while others, client schedule permitting, go past 1a.m.. Starting at 9:30p.m. as of this report (July 27 th ), I’ll break down our gear and rig up mousing rods – streamer rods with floating, glow-tip fly line – and by or before 10p.m., it will be completely dark in many of the runs and pools. While I have run, and still offer, an evening kickoff with a mousing-centric float until 4a.m., the afternoon flows, bite windows, and bug activity recently is not something to be missed. Conventional, streamer, mousing, and dry flies are all in play, and on every cast, I wouldn’t be surprised if an eat resulted in a 10" fish or a 20"+ fish. While we prefer the latter, they are the exception to the rule, though it’s been active enough to cover all of my favorite types of trout fishing as very reasonable options to boat some good fish. Oh, and it’s beetle season, so low water isn’t all bad since we can fish sections that aren’t fished by other boats. Since you’re still here, I’ll add that the stripers from Boone lake are up in the rivers in the lower halves, and feed during the flows and conditions that are prime for both streamer/jerkbait fishing and mousing. I love my office, and while it takes effort, and more often than not, a lot of it, I have had the privilege of watching others fall for it, too.
    Late July 2022 As we enter into the latter half of the summer here in East Tennessee, seasonal patterns are right down the fairway, and fishing has been as good as it gets. I’ll focus on the tailwaters – The Watauga River below Wilbur Dam, and the South Holston River below South Holston Dam. Our tailwaters are fed by their respective dams, and without a lot of precipitation and flow contribution from the tributaries, fishing ‘low’ water (e.g. when the dams are not releasing), particularly in the high traffic areas, is something I tend to avoid. Thankfully, for the last 6+ weeks, the Watauga has been consistently releasing good flows starting in the early afternoon, and we have a healthy amount of precipitation in the 7 day forecast both locally and in the feeder streams through TN and NC. In the last week, which was comprised of 4 full day client floats and 2 days on my own, all on the Watauga River in sections ranging from the Dam to the Lake, surface feeding activity has been consistent enough to provide anglers of nearly all skill levels with shots at brown trout and rainbow trout on dry flies. With some patience, those who have experience in dry fly fishing have landed – and lost – a few trout, both rainbow and brown, approaching 20 inches, with a lot of very sporty 10-12" wild rainbows mixed in. Generation, Dam releases, High Water, whatever you’d like to call it, opens up the river for both the angler and the predatory fish. We have been covering a lot of water, predmoninantly with a streamer rod in hand(s), while stopping for rising fish. Working risers with dry flies can easily take up half the day if that is the angler preference. Streamer fishing has produced some truly remarkable fish for a few folks who came in knowing what to do – it’s not an easy approach, but it’s certainly my favorite, and I am not alone there. For those with less fly fishing experience, or just because it’s also awesome and a change of pace, we’ll throw some fairly sizeable jerkbaits, which always has the potential to elicit some breathtaking eats from the ambush predator brown trout. Some trips go from early afternoon until dusk, while others, client schedule permitting, go past 1a.m.. Starting at 9:30p.m. as of this report (July 27 th ), I’ll break down our gear and rig up mousing rods – streamer rods with floating, glow-tip fly line – and by or before 10p.m., it will be completely dark in many of the runs and pools. While I have run, and still offer, an evening kickoff with a mousing-centric float until 4a.m., the afternoon flows, bite windows, and bug activity recently is not something to be missed. Conventional, streamer, mousing, and dry flies are all in play, and on every cast, I wouldn’t be surprised if an eat resulted in a 10" fish or a 20"+ fish. While we prefer the latter, they are the exception to the rule, though it’s been active enough to cover all of my favorite types of trout fishing as very reasonable options to boat some good fish. Oh, and it’s beetle season, so low water isn’t all bad since we can fish sections that aren’t fished by other boats. Since you’re still here, I’ll add that the stripers from Boone lake are up in the rivers in the lower halves, and feed during the flows and conditions that are prime for both streamer/jerkbait fishing and mousing. I love my office, and while it takes effort, and more often than not, a lot of it, I have had the privilege of watching others fall for it, too.

Techniques in Johnson City

Species in Johnson City

Water Types in Johnson City