Damn good fishing guides in Blue Ridge, Georgia

Check Real-Time Availability on 10 Trips

Top fishing trips in Blue Ridge, GA

Everything to Know About Booking a fishing trip in Blue Ridge

What are the best fishing trips in Blue Ridge?

Our Damn Good Guides currently offer 10 trips in Blue Ridge, and the most popular trips in the area are Wild Trout Classic guided by Tad, Full Day Public Water - WADE FISHING guided by Noah, and Blue Ridge Special guided by Tad.

All guides on Captain Experiences are licensed, insured, and vetted by our team. You can access their reviews, click through trip photos, read bios to get to know them, and preview trip details like species, techniques, group sizes, boat specs and more.

What types of fishing trips are common in Blue Ridge?

River fishing is the most popular in Blue Ridge.

The most commonly sought after species in Blue Ridge are: 1. brown trout, 2. rainbow trout, 3. cutthroat trout, and 4. brook trout.

The most common fishing techniques in Blue Ridge are fly fishing, wading, and drift fishing.

How much does a Blue Ridge fishing trip cost?

in Blue Ridge prices can range anywhere from $200 to $600, but the average price for a half day in Blue Ridge is $309. The average price for a full day in Blue Ridge is $412.

When is the best time to go fishing in Blue Ridge?

The most popular season for fishing in Blue Ridge is summer, and most anglers book their trips 13 days in advance.

Where can I get a Blue Ridge fishing license and what are the bag limits in Blue Ridge?

See here for more information on fishing licenses in Blue Ridge, bag limits for target species, and fishing season regulations in Blue Ridge. When in doubt, your fishing guide will always know the right rules and regulations in Blue Ridge.



How are fishing conditions in Blue Ridge?

Blue Ridge Fishing Reports from Our Damn Good Guides. See more reports for Blue Ridge.

    The dog day of summer mean its time to escape the heat and head for the headwaters and small streams of North Georgia or the cooled tailwaters of the Chattahoochee River or Toccoa River. The dry fly bite has been excellent. Trout can be caught on a myriad of flies as all insects are present. Stoneflies, mayflies, caddis and terrestrial imitations will catch fish throughout the day. If you are out at an odd time when trout don't want to rise add a small/simple dropper fly below your dry. Majority of the hatching bugs are on the small end of the spectrum with some larger mayflies showing up in the evening. The Appalachian slam (brook, brown, and rainbow trout) is still very achievable on most days. Several customers have landed theirs on half day outings since June. Be sure to keep an eye on the weather as afternoon thunderstorms can pop up quickly. For me, lightning is a quick time out, but heavy winds can be scary under a dense canopy. Chattahoochee Tailwater Fly Fishing The tailwater below Lanier is still a good bet for a shorter day on the water. The normal patterns of midges and junk flies are still catching most of the trout. The recent rains we have had have thrown a bit of a curveball at the trout but with the right adjustments you can still do well. Bigger flies or small streamers have been fishing well in the lowlight hours. For a break in the trout action, bigger groups of bass than normal have also been gathering at the mouths of creeks once water levels in the feeder creeks reside.
    The dog day of summer mean its time to escape the heat and head for the headwaters and small streams of North Georgia or the cooled tailwaters of the Chattahoochee River or Toccoa River. The dry fly bite has been excellent. Trout can be caught on a myriad of flies as all insects are present. Stoneflies, mayflies, caddis and terrestrial imitations will catch fish throughout the day. If you are out at an odd time when trout don't want to rise add a small/simple dropper fly below your dry. Majority of the hatching bugs are on the small end of the spectrum with some larger mayflies showing up in the evening. The Appalachian slam (brook, brown, and rainbow trout) is still very achievable on most days. Several customers have landed theirs on half day outings since June. Be sure to keep an eye on the weather as afternoon thunderstorms can pop up quickly. For me, lightning is a quick time out, but heavy winds can be scary under a dense canopy. Chattahoochee Tailwater Fly Fishing The tailwater below Lanier is still a good bet for a shorter day on the water. The normal patterns of midges and junk flies are still catching most of the trout. The recent rains we have had have thrown a bit of a curveball at the trout but with the right adjustments you can still do well. Bigger flies or small streamers have been fishing well in the lowlight hours. For a break in the trout action, bigger groups of bass than normal have also been gathering at the mouths of creeks once water levels in the feeder creeks reside.
    The dog day of summer mean its time to escape the heat and head for the headwaters and small streams of North Georgia or the cooled tailwaters of the Chattahoochee River or Toccoa River. The dry fly bite has been excellent. Trout can be caught on a myriad of flies as all insects are present. Stoneflies, mayflies, caddis and terrestrial imitations will catch fish throughout the day. If you are out at an odd time when trout don't want to rise add a small/simple dropper fly below your dry. Majority of the hatching bugs are on the small end of the spectrum with some larger mayflies showing up in the evening. The Appalachian slam (brook, brown, and rainbow trout) is still very achievable on most days. Several customers have landed theirs on half day outings since June. Be sure to keep an eye on the weather as afternoon thunderstorms can pop up quickly. For me, lightning is a quick time out, but heavy winds can be scary under a dense canopy. Chattahoochee Tailwater Fly Fishing The tailwater below Lanier is still a good bet for a shorter day on the water. The normal patterns of midges and junk flies are still catching most of the trout. The recent rains we have had have thrown a bit of a curveball at the trout but with the right adjustments you can still do well. Bigger flies or small streamers have been fishing well in the lowlight hours. For a break in the trout action, bigger groups of bass than normal have also been gathering at the mouths of creeks once water levels in the feeder creeks reside.

Species in Blue Ridge

Techniques in Blue Ridge

Water Types in Blue Ridge